What White People Don’t Know (about Racism)

I thought that I knew what racism was, and I also thought that I was a fair and unprejudiced person. I was wrong. Why is the heart of racism so difficult to discuss? How do we approach the problem of prejudice responsibly and with an eye to change? Conversations about race tend to focus on …

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Infectious Disease: Public Safety v. Personal Freedom

The incarceration of Mary Mallon as a host of the infectious typhoid fever pathogen was an event which sparked much debate in the early 20th century. Several health officials spoke against her involuntary quarantine at Riverside Hospital on North Brother Island. She was even released from quarantine in 1910 due largely to the efforts of …

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The Birth of Modern Feminism: 15th Century Europe

In Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, written circa 1405, the author places herself in the lead role of an allegorical tale of a philosophical journey in pursuit of truth. She confers with three daughters of God in dialogues that describe a very different sort femininity than was recognized in her time. …

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Theorizing: The Greek Dialectical Method as a Precursor for the Scientific Method

Assertion: The ancient Greek philosophers’ Dialectical Method is the main influence on the premise of the modern Scientific Method. According to the Oxford-English Dictionary, the Scientific Method is defined as “A method of procedure that has characterized natural science since the 17th century, consisting in systematic observation, measurement, and experiment, and the formulation, testing, and modification …

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Egyptian Influence on Minoan Religion and Culture

The Minoans of ancient Greece embodied one the world’s first great civilizations, with innovations that pervaded nearly every facet of their lives. The Egyptians, across the sea and equally great in their own right, had a rich, ancient culture that undoubtedly influenced all who encountered it. When the two civilizations collided, an exchange of goods …

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Abraham Lincoln Predicted U.S. Downfall by Avarice

“America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.” – Abraham Lincoln This quote by our nation’s most influential historical executor gave me more than a moment’s pause. I couldn’t help but compose some reactionary thoughts. First: Positivity. This quote by President Abraham …

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Laocoon and His Sons: Ancient Greek Art as a Model for Cultural Identity

It’s dramatic. It’s beautiful. It’s 3 naked men in poses of defenselessness!          Classical Greek art embodies the most basic, visceral drive behind the creation of beautiful things by humans. Other than the strictly formulary and objective art of the Egyptians, the ancient Greeks did not have the benefit of any predecessor …

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Gothic Architecture: Ridiculously Anatomical

            Browsing through some photos of Gothic cathedrals, I was stricken by a resemblance between the Gothic architectural style and its look-alike components in human anatomy. Interior of the Chartres Cathedral   The ribbed vaulting of the Chartres Cathedral in France, bears a striking resemblance to an interior body cavity, …

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