On Laziness (A Pointless Post)

There is glamour in laziness. It’s a kind of glimmering in the eye accompanied by lithe movements; like a Southern Georgia drawl, it is only possible to attain after years of indolence in the absence of worry. You cannot summon it; it must descend on you like lacy film. I feel rich in these moments, …

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A Brief History of Humanism

Humanism was an influence at the very heart of the Renaissance, and sought to restore education that was based on ancient Greek and Latin writings in an effort to renew the best aspects of the civilizations of Greece and Rome. These classical writings were meant to serve as a moral compass for how to best …

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Science’s Love/Hate Relationship with Math

A colleague once asked me what I thought about the relationships between science and math. He was confounded by the seemingly shifting relationship between these disciplines, as he innately understood that there was a significant connection there, but could not quite make sense of it all. Why does physics seem to use so much mathematical …

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Infectious Disease: Public Safety v. Personal Freedom

The incarceration of Mary Mallon as a host of the infectious typhoid fever pathogen was an event which sparked much debate in the early 20th century. Several health officials spoke against her involuntary quarantine at Riverside Hospital on North Brother Island. She was even released from quarantine in 1910 due largely to the efforts of …

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Theorizing: The Greek Dialectical Method as a Precursor for the Scientific Method

Assertion: The ancient Greek philosophers’ Dialectical Method is the main influence on the premise of the modern Scientific Method. According to the Oxford-English Dictionary, the Scientific Method is defined as “A method of procedure that has characterized natural science since the 17th century, consisting in systematic observation, measurement, and experiment, and the formulation, testing, and modification …

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On Hume’s “Dialogues” and Argument from Design

In an unprecedented treatise on the fallacies of conventional religious belief and the limitations of certain types of logic in understanding the nature of God, 18th Century philosopher David Hume introduced an innovative, skeptical view on religious thought. By casting three characters in the roles of the Epicurean, the Stoic and the Academic, Hume contributed …

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The Biochemistry of Affection: Love, Scientifically

Why do we do what we do when we get a case of the Lovesies... Chemicals such as neurotransmitters, sex hormones, and neuropeptides are responsible for the behaviors humankind exhibits, as well as the moods they experience during attraction, dating, sex, and love. The effect of these chemicals is fairly intense, especially in comparison to …

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Gothic Architecture: Ridiculously Anatomical

            Browsing through some photos of Gothic cathedrals, I was stricken by a resemblance between the Gothic architectural style and its look-alike components in human anatomy. Interior of the Chartres Cathedral   The ribbed vaulting of the Chartres Cathedral in France, bears a striking resemblance to an interior body cavity, …

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