A Brief History of Humanism

Humanism was an influence at the very heart of the Renaissance, and sought to restore education that was based on ancient Greek and Latin writings in an effort to renew the best aspects of the civilizations of Greece and Rome. These classical writings were meant to serve as a moral compass for how to best …

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Science’s Love/Hate Relationship with Math

A colleague once asked me what I thought about the relationships between science and math. He was confounded by the seemingly shifting relationship between these disciplines, as he innately understood that there was a significant connection there, but could not quite make sense of it all. Why does physics seem to use so much mathematical …

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What White People Don’t Know (about Racism)

I thought that I knew what racism was, and I also thought that I was a fair and unprejudiced person. I was wrong. Why is the heart of racism so difficult to discuss? How do we approach the problem of prejudice responsibly and with an eye to change? Conversations about race tend to focus on …

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The Artist’s Widow – An Interview

Andrew Wyeth is most famous for the painting featured in this post, entitled Christina's World. Wyeth's detractors claim that the painter staged a "discovery"of hundreds of illicit, decades old paintings of his own making, featuring his muse and lover, Helga Testorf. The following is the transcript of an interview with the widow of the famous …

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The Last White Girl in El Paso

Thoughts on My Body: Sexuality, Feminism and Self-Concept in Generation X I wasn’t always the ugly kid in school. Petite, small-boned, with flaming red hair in curly ringlets and pale freckled skin: I hardly had a chance. I sailed through early childhood oblivious to my own rareness at first. My grandmother loved me so well …

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Infectious Disease: Public Safety v. Personal Freedom

The incarceration of Mary Mallon as a host of the infectious typhoid fever pathogen was an event which sparked much debate in the early 20th century. Several health officials spoke against her involuntary quarantine at Riverside Hospital on North Brother Island. She was even released from quarantine in 1910 due largely to the efforts of …

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The Birth of Modern Feminism: 15th Century Europe

In Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, written circa 1405, the author places herself in the lead role of an allegorical tale of a philosophical journey in pursuit of truth. She confers with three daughters of God in dialogues that describe a very different sort femininity than was recognized in her time. …

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A Modern and Practical Take on Plato’s Philosophy

Plato’s Republic approaches questions about the nature of goodness, how it affects the actions of men, the nature of truth, what motivates us, and the nature of justice. Plato does so with an eye to exploring the socio-political and individual ramifications of these topics, as well as explaining his theories on how they are inextricably …

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Theorizing: The Greek Dialectical Method as a Precursor for the Scientific Method

Assertion: The ancient Greek philosophers’ Dialectical Method is the main influence on the premise of the modern Scientific Method. According to the Oxford-English Dictionary, the Scientific Method is defined as “A method of procedure that has characterized natural science since the 17th century, consisting in systematic observation, measurement, and experiment, and the formulation, testing, and modification …

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